pain is information

Posted on May 27, 2014 by

I went running this morning.  Just a short run, on the beach.  it’s 50 degrees and windy, and this is my first .run. this season, and my first barefoot run.

You saw my clothing rant–today’s solution: running dress from Mountain Hardwear (size L) (shoutout to them for also having a men’s kilt!) with a wind-resistant fleece (LL Bean.  I live in Maine) and a Moving Comfort bra (they rock.  Totally completely rock.).  Bare feet (running on packed sand ftw) and bare legs.

Result: exactly the way it should be.  I didn’t notice anything bouncing or chafing or otherwise distracting from my workout.

That said, it was cold.  I ran until I felt like walking (my usual start-exercising routine.  It works.) and once I slowed down my much-neglected calves started cramping.

What I didn’t do: “push through it”

What I did do: keep moving.  Because cold plus stillness equals trouble.

I stretched and eased and moved and kept walking.

And I cut my workout a little shorter than usual.  Generally I go about 3 miles walking and running.  Today, more like 1.

Why?

1) pain is information.  It tells you something’s not right.  I don’t believe in ignoring it.

2) working out should be fun and enjoyable.  This doesn’t mean you can’t challenge yourself but it does mean not making yourself miserable.  If I’m miserable today, I likely won’t go tomorrow.  Today I get points for going in the drizzly, grey, cold morning.  Things I will remember: that I wasn’t cold once I started moving, that running felt good, that I recovered easily.  Things I won’t remember because they didn’t happen: that I was miserable, unhappy, or sick afterwards.  The thing about movement is that when it feels good we do more of it.  It felt good to move.  I’ll remember that.  Plus, I got to pet a friendly dog.

I am an athlete.  Therefore I listen to my body.  It makes me want to move, and it makes me want to take good care of it.

How do you want to take care of your body when you’re moving?  Tweet it! hashtag #Iamanathlete